Summer 2016 Courses

Philosophy Courses

Summer 2016

SUMMER I

 

PHIL 004                             BELIEF, KNOWLEDGE, AND ACTION: AN INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (4) 

                                              PROF. B HULSIZER

                                              MTWR 12:00-1:35 PM

Through reading selected texts in philosophy, from the ancient period to the modern Enlightenment and Romantic reaction, this course will introduce students to some of the central positions concerning knowledge, reality, ethics, and justice developed in relation to their historical contexts.  A unifying theme will be the emergence and evolution of rational thought and its relation to belief, knowledge, and action. (HU)

 

PHIL/REL/HMS 116        BIOETHICS (4)

                                            PROF. L STEFFEN  

                                            MW 7:00 – 10:00 PM

Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. (HU)

 

PHIL 120                          PHILOSOPHY IN FILM (4)

                                           PROF. K BURAK

                                           MW 4:00 – 7:00 PM

This seminar course will explore a variety of themes, genres, and movements within cinema from a philosophical perspective.  Regular screenings of films from silent era to present.  Content may vary depending upon instructor.  Course may be repeated for credit if the content varies substantially. (HU)

 

PHIL 128                             PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (ON-LINE) (4)

                                             PROF. S GOLDMAN

Introduction to the structure and methods of scientific investigation. The nature of explanation, confirmation, and falsification. Scientific progress: What is it? Would it be suffocated by obedience to completely rational methods? (HU)

 

PHIL 145                            PHILOSOPHY AND TECHNOLOGY (ON-LINE (4)

                                             PROF. G REIHMAN

This course is an exploration of questions of metaphysics and morality in the digital age. Are new technologies changing our views of metaphysics (what's real) and morality (what's right)? Can classical and contemporary philosophical theories help us think more clearly and make better choices when faced with new technologies? To help answer these questions, students will read a variety of philosophical works that invite critical reflection on a broad array of topics at the intersection of philosophy and technology. (HU)

 

PHIL 195                             MYTH, IMAGINATION, AND TRUTH (ON-LINE) (4)

                                             PROF. P CASEY

If one were to ask people on the street to think of word associations of the word “myth,” one would typically encounter responses like “fable”, “falsehood”, “fabrication” and the like.  Additionally, the responses might elicit the sensation that myth is thought of as somehow regressive, opposed to the truths and advances of science; it may have been fine for ancient, naïve, pre-scientific cultures, perhaps, but not for contemporary humans. But is this characterization of myth accurate?  Are myths simply pre-scientific attempts at theoretical explanations of phenomena, or is there something more significant embedded within them?  Is it possible that myths are a unique tool of the imagination to plumb the deepest, most primordial and most basic truths of humanity? (HU)

 

PHIL 197                             BUSINESS ETHICS (4)

                                              PROF. N SCHMIDT

                                              MTWR 2:00 – 3:35 PM

This course will explore moral problems that arise in the production and distribution of goods and services. Topics may include: the intersection of government and business, stakeholder vs stockholder theory, moral obligations of employers and employees, discrimination in the workplace, theories of ownership, fraudulent practices, cons and scams, and ethics in sales. (HU)

 

SUMMER II

 

PHIL 004                             BELIEF, KNOWLEDGE, AND ACTION: AN INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (4)

                                             PROF. B HULSIZER

                                             MTWR 12:00 – 1:35 PM

Through reading selected texts in philosophy, from the ancient period to the modern Enlightenment and Romantic reaction, this course will introduce students to some of the central positions concerning knowledge, reality, ethics, and justice developed in relation to their historical contexts.  A unifying theme will be the emergence and evolution of rational thought and its relation to belief, knowledge, and action. (HU)

 

PHIL 105                             ETHICS (ON-LINE ) (4)

                                              PROF. K BURAK

Examination of right and wrong, good and bad, from classic sources such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill and Nietzsche. (HU)

 

PHIL/REL/HMS 116        BIOETHICS (4)

                                            PROF. N SCHMIDT

                                            MTWR 2:00 – 3:35 PM

Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. (HU)

 

PHIL 120                             PHILOSOPHY IN FILM (ON-LINE COURSE) (4)

                                              PROF. G REIHMAN

This seminar course will explore a variety of themes, genres, and movements within cinema from a philosophical perspective.  Regular screenings of films from silent era to present.  Content may vary depending upon instructor.  Course may be repeated for credit if the content varies substantially. (HU)

 

PHIL 196                             PHILOSOPHY OF LOVE AND SEXUALITY (4)

                                              PROF. P CASEY

                                              MW 4:00 – 7:00 PM

The philosophy of love is something of an odd hybrid. Philosophy, by its very nature, seeks wisdom through questioning and analysis; yet, love, by its own nature, may seem to elude such systematic treatment. After all, isn’t love a fleeting and an ephemeral feeling? What could lend itself less to systematic analysis than love? Even in this short statement questioning the legitimacy of the subject itself, we can see the usefulness of philosophy. For in making these simple assertions about love, there are a great many unexamined assumptions about the nature of love: Is there only one kind of love? Is love simply a feeling? Is love really love if it is fleeting? These are but a few of the topics we will consider in this course. (HU)