Summer 2015 Courses

Philosophy Courses

Summer 2015

 

SUMMER I

 

PHIL 004                      BELIEF, KNOWLEDGE, AND ACTION: AN INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (4)

                                    PROF. B HULSIZER

Through reading selected texts in philosophy, from the ancient period to the modern Enlightenment and Romantic reaction, this course will introduce students to some of the central positions concerning knowledge, reality, ethics, and justice developed in relation to their historical contexts.  A unifying theme will be the emergence and evolution of rational thought and its relation to belief, knowledge, and action. (HU)

 

PHIL 105                      ETHICS (4)

                                    PROF. N SCHMIDT

Examination of right and wrong, good and bad, from classic sources such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill and Nietzsche. (HU)

 

PHIL/REL/HMS 116     BIOETHICS (4)

                                    PROF. L STEFFEN  

Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. (HU)

 

PHIL 120                      PHILOSOPHY IN FILM (FULLY ON-LINE COURSE) (4)

                                    PROF. G REIHMAN

This seminar course will explore a variety of themes, genres, and movements within cinema from a philosophical perspective.  (HU) 

 

PHIL/REL 195              BIOETHICS AND THE LAW (4)

                                    PROF. D DAVIS

Students in this course will learn something about the foundations and (nontechnical) workings of the American system of justice, and will combine that understanding with a focus on various topics in bioethics, from the “right to die” to the gene-patenting. A key point will be the understanding that, as science and medicine continually move forward, there are always new challenges to existing legal understanding. How should the law respond to the new questions, e.g. inheritance rights of posthumously conceived children? (HU)

 

PHIL 197                      KNOWLEDGE, TRUTH, AND FICTION (4)

                                    PROF. M MENDELSON

“Knowledge,” we all suspect, is somehow intimately related to that which is “true.” “Friction” seems to bear an intimate connection to that which is not true. And yet, we often turn to fiction in as a source of “truths” and forms of “knowledge” –novels, poems, plays, music, and cinema to cite examples. The obvious question is that of how can that which is supposed to be in some sense “false” serve as such a profound source of the “knowledge” and “truths” at work here? Just how does that which is “false” manage to generate some kind of “knowledge” of “truth”? In this course we will approach these issues via philosophical texts (e.g. Plato, Nietzsche, and Sartre), and we will also examine a variety of cinematic, poetic, and musical works that seem intended to impart a “knowledge” of “truths” by means of the oblique approach we call “fiction.” (HU)



 

SUMMER II

 

PHIL 004                      BELIEF, KNOWLEDGE, AND ACTION: AN INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (4)

                                    PROF. B HULSIZER

Through reading selected texts in philosophy, from the ancient period to the modern Enlightenment and Romantic reaction, this course will introduce students to some of the central positions concerning knowledge, reality, ethics, and justice developed in relation to their historical contexts.  A unifying theme will be the emergence and evolution of rational thought and its relation to belief, knowledge, and action. (HU)

 

PHIL/REL/HMS 116     BIOETHICS (4)

                                    PROF. N SCHMIDT

Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. (HU)

 

PHIL 198                      EXPLORING THE DARKNESS WE CALL DEATH  (4)

                                    PROF. M MENDELSON

“Death”: it is an ominous and strange word, one that more often than not conjures a visceral and even foreboding response, nor is it surprising that it should do so given the unsettling loss that the word seems to portend. And then there is the fact that it is so far from obvious just what the referent of the word is. In this course, we will explore a variety of straightforwardly philosophical texts as well as cinematic and literary works that provide various competing and often conflicting accounts of how we are to regard this conspicuous yet opaque feature of the moral landscape within which we reside. (HU)