Summer 2014 courses

SUMMER I

PHIL 1  THE EXAMINED LIFE (4)
PROF. B HULSIZER
What makes a life meaningful, what makes it worth living? In pursuit of an answer to this question this course examines many of the basic questions of philosophy: ethical questions about justice and virtue, epistemological questions about the limits of human knowledge, metaphysical questions about what there is. (HU)

PHIL 23  ARTISTS ON ART AND LIFE (4)
PROF. G BEARN
One of the peculiarities of the philosophical study of art, Aesthetics, is that philosophers ignore the writing of artists on art. This introduction to philosophy does not. Aestheticians spend much of their time writing about what art is. Artists are more interested in what art does and how art does it, and those questions will be the focus of this course. We will be reading works of and looking at the artwork of artists who might include: van Gogh, Cezanne, Madeline Gins, Picasso, Alberti, Hogarth, Mondrain, Kandinsky, Klee, Debussy, Leonardo, Le Corbusier, Anne Truit, Schoenberg, Tarkovsky, Boccioni, Alison Knowles, Alan Kaprow, Laurie Anderson, Robert Venturi and Dennis Scott Brown, Francis Bacon, and more. (HU)

PHIL 105 ETHICS (4)
PROF. K BURAK
Examination of right and wrong, good and bad, from classic sources such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill and Nietzsche. (HU)

PHIL/REL 116 BIOETHICS (4)
PROF. L STEFFEN
Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. (HU)

PHIL 120  PHILOSOPHY IN FILM (4)
PROF. K BURAK
This seminar course will explore a variety of themes, genres, and movements within cinema from a philosophical perspective. Regular screenings of films from silent era to present. Content may vary depending upon instructor. Course may be repeated for credit if the content varies substantially. (HU)

PHIL/ASIA 140 EASTERN PHILOSOPHY (4)
PROF. N SCHMIDT
Survey of selected texts and issues in the eastern philosophical traditions. Attention will be given to the development and interrelations of these traditions as well as a comparison of western and eastern treatments of selected issues. Areas of focus may include Confucianism, Taoism, and Zen Buddhism. (HU)

PHIL 197  PHILOSOPHY, THE SUBLIME, AND HORROR (4)
PROF. M MENDELSON
What we call “horror” was not always the sort of thing Hollywood would now have us think it is; once it was (and sometimes still is) a vehicle for exploring certain sorts of experiences and conceptual possibilities that fall outside the kinds of optimism that we embrace, both philosophically and in our daily lives. We will examine philosophical works by Burke, Kant, and Noel Carroll (among others); literary works by Le Fanu, Henry James, and Robert Louis Stevenson; and cinematic works by Dreyer, Murnau, Whale, Browning, and Freund. For a fuller, more detailed description, contact Professor Mendelson at mhm4@lehigh.edu


SUMMER II

PHIL 1  THE EXAMINED LIFE (4)
PROF. B HULSIZER
What makes a life meaningful, what makes it worth living? In pursuit of an answer to this question this course examines many of the basic questions of philosophy: ethical questions about justice and virtue, epistemological questions about the limits of human knowledge, metaphysical questions about what there is. (HU)

PHIL 114  SYMBOLIC LOGIC (4)
PROF. N SCHMIDT
A first course in logical theory, introducing the notions of logical consequence and proof, as well as related concepts such as consistency and contingency. Formal systems taught may include: term logic, sentence logic, and predicate logic. (MA)

PHIL/REL 116  BIOETHICS (4)
PROF. N SCHMIDT
Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. (HU)

PHIL 120  PHILOSOPHY IN FILM (4)
PROF. G REIHMAN (ONLINE)
This seminar course will explore a variety of themes, genres, and movements within cinema from a philosophical perspective. Regular screenings of films from silent era to present. Content may vary depending upon instructor. Course may be repeated for credit if the content varies substantially. (HU)

PHIL 145  PHILOSOPHY AND TECHNOLOGY
PROF. G REIHMAN (ONLINE)
This course is an exploration of questions of metaphysics and morality in the digital age. Are new technologies changing our views of metaphysics (what's real) and morality (what's right)? Can classical and contemporary philosophical theories help us think more clearly and make better choices when faced with new technologies? To help answer these questions, students will read a variety of philosophical works that invite critical reflection on a broad array of topics at the intersection of philosophy and technology.

PHIL 198 PHILOSOPHY AND CONTEMPORARY GOTHIC  (4)
PROF. M MENDELSON
Though often simply characterized as an off-shoot of early nineteenth century Romanticism, “The Gothic” endures as a genre, and then as now, it offers alternate, often unsettling but nonetheless serious ways of viewing the moral landscape within which we find ourselves, especially with respect to such issues as the prevalence and effects of the exclusion and marginalization of those who differ from ourselves. We will examine works by such (relatively) contemporary authors as Patrick McGrath, Joyce Carol Oates, and Poppy Z. Brite, as well as various contemporary visual (e.g. painting and cinema), musical, and poetic examples of exploring and raising questions regarding some of the often unarticulated philosophical and existential assumptions that govern our view of the social and moral structures within which we try comfortably to reside. For a fuller, more detailed description, contact Professor Mendelson at mhm4@lehigh.edu